Dependents

15 05 2010

The above billboard was displayed in Buffalo, NY during a recent trip by President Obama.  The website advertised on the billboard is www.inafj.org. I Need A Freakin Job expresses its frustration with career politicians mingling too much in free market America and the mandating of expensive policies that are being funded by a large unemployed sector- America’s working age youth.

Growing up as dependents of our parents, we were taught to lean on mom and dad for every need. Food, clothing, shelter, fun, wisdom, transportation, you name it, it was provided by our parents. We were their dependents because we depended on them for all of our needs.  As we got older, we became less dependent on them for simple things like lacing up our shoes, cleaning our rooms, making new friends.  However, we were still dependent on dear old mom and dad for food, shelter, clothes, and wisdom.  Most of us became more independent as we grew and mom and dad learned to let us go out into the world on our own. And now, while mom and dad still may help out and pass down some wisdom every now and then, we are no longer dependent on mom and dad. We are independent.

Now lets look at our government dependency.  Government’s role in our everyday lives has grown dramatically over the years.

  • Politicians push for free health care for children.
  • Government paid for early childhood education.
  • Free lunches at school.
  • More grants for college.
  • Extended health coverage for those in college and afterwards.
  • Cushy government jobs with guaranteed raises and retirements.
  • Welfare for those that can’t adapt to the private sector.
  • Expansion of free public transportation.
  • Free health care for seniors.

As you can see, we depend on the government starting at an early age and this dependency is becoming greater every day for more and more Americans. As you know from being a dependent of your parents, your personal feelings and decisions are closely monitored by your parents because of your dependent status. You may want something, but mom and dad know best. You must respect their authority, because afterall, they provide food, clothing and shelter. For the most part, children and parents honor this dependent system and look forward the day of transforming from a dependent to an individual with personal responsibilities and full fledge freedom.  And that is the problem with growing government dependence. There is no end to our government dependence; therefore, we are forced to limit our personal decision making and life choices because of the power held by a small number of bureaucrats.

With freedom comes responsibility. With less responsibility, we will ultimately have less freedom.





Danny’s Daily

30 04 2010

Well, I’m going to try and get back on board with blogging. Thanks to our current political atmosphere, there is plenty on my mind to share with the rest of you. If you want to keep up on Erin and our little bun in the oven (Eddie), check out our new family blog.

Cheers,

Danny





Age of Socialism

15 10 2009

Socialism is here! Social Security is suppossed to go up every year to make up for inflation; however, inflation actually decreased this year. To make up for the lack of an increase, Washington wants to redistribute our wealth (aka, debt-load). Here’s the article if you care to read more about it: http://apnews.myway.com/article/20091015/D9BB77S00.html .





Fear of Failure: Education

31 08 2009

While receiving my secondary education degree, I read countless articles and listened to numerous lectures detailing educational theories meant to provide children with the tools they need to succeed.  One theory I never heard about was the fear of failure; however, I am starting to believe that this is the equation some children may need in order to inspire current and future generations to reach above and beyond their expectations.

It’s hard to use my personal account in determining the road map for how public education should be handled. I had no learning disabilities. I was physically healthy, had a great home life, English was my first and only language, and I had no problem adapting socially to the different personalities of school life.  I know that for others individual education, they may had/have more challenges: learning disabilities, broken homes, language barriers, low self esteems, etc.  However, I believe that in many instances personal challenges should be used as a catalyst for one to succeed.  The option for not succeeding is to fail. The fear of failure should not be swept under the rug; rather, it should be embraced and used as motivation for a generation that is consumed with too much political correctness, public safety nets, and nanny-state laws.

While living near Santa Barbara, California, I had the wonderful opportunity of befriending my neighbor, Constantine.  Constantine was born in northern Indiana to Greek parents.  During many Greek barbecues Constantine hosted, I had the pleasure of meeting George.  George was born and raised in Greece until the age of 16.  He then moved to Michigan to live with an uncle.  Nowadays, schools are forced to spend millions of dollars to cater to students like George and help them deal with the language and cultural barriers that they experience. These programs are referred to as ESL (English as a second language).  These programs are a challenge for schools to fund.  Qualified teachers are hard to find and teachers are burdened with paper work and meetings dealing with the requirements that go along with ESL learning programs.

One inexpensive program we could use would be the one George’s uncle used: adapt, ASAP!  George told me that he remembers going to school in fear of not catching up to the learning curve.  His uncle required him to not speak Greek while at home and the school had no program to assist him in his new surroundings.  George did not want to fail, and this fear led to him quickly catching up to the kids around him.  Now he is a successful bilingual mechanical engineer who still loves and embraces his Greek culture while he enjoys the freedom and opportunity of his American lifestyle.

I’m not saying that the fear of failure would work for every child’s education; however, I do believe we need to study and teach the postive results that can come from fearing negative consequences.





Fear of Failure

10 08 2009

Out of all the things that have made America great, I believe our greatest success stories have come not from the will to succeed; but rather, from the fear of failure.  Let me explain.

In the history of America, many stories exist that detail one man’s, one woman’s, one family’s, one race’s, one generation’s rising the social and economic ladder to add their name to the history books as another American success story.  Opportunity for all has been a staple of this country since we toppled the giant arm of monarchical rule over 200 years ago.  But behind every success story has been a driving force that some may not always think about at first: the fear of failure.

When our Founding Fathers signed their names for King George III to see, these colonists were not only motivated by the dream of living in a free market society; they must have been encouraged by the plain and simple fear of failure. Failure for them meant embarrassment for their family, loss of their property, and most likely death.  However, despite this fear, our Founders and thousands of colonial soliders and families chose to stand up to their fears of the powerful British Kingdom and create a free society built on freedom principles and inherited rights.

Over 200 years later, American success stories have been a testament to the power of freedom.  But the freedom to succeed could not have been possible without the risk and fear of failure.  To be continued…





Sore Muscles

16 07 2009

As many of you already know, I’m currently training for a marathon.  As the training becomes more rigorous and the long runs are getting longer and longer every week, my muscles are starting to get a little sore. Soreness is a reality of getting in shape, a natural result of getting your body out of its comfort zone and testing ones physical limits.  If all goes well, the soreness will decrease as your body gets stronger; and hopefully, what once made you sore will feel like a walk in the park.

Erin and I were discussing the goods and bads about moving home this evening. As I was dwelling on some of the adjustments we have been forced to make, I commented to her, “I guess one can’t get into shape without first making his muscles sore.” She told me to blog about it, so I did.





Stuck in the Mud

8 07 2009

Yesterday evening I decided to do a little off-roading on my property.  After looking at a creek crossing and asking myself, “Can I make it through that?,” here I am sitting at my computer while my truck is still sitting in the middle of the woods.  My dad was able to help me get out of the rut that initially got me stuck, now I’m waiting on Mother Nature to help with stopping the rain so I can make it back up the way I came down.  After walking up the hill I asked my dad why he is so good at getting things un-stuck.  He wittingly responded, “Because I’ve been stuck so many times.”  So dont’ be afraid to get stuck in the mud every now and then.  The more you do it, the better you’ll be at getting yourself un-stuck.








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